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Temporary closure path to BUC car park

Posted on 13 March, 2016

Temporary closure of link path between the church and BUC car park

 

The link path between the church car park and the overflow car park situated at the BUC offices has been closed temporarily during the construction of the Peace Garden. Pastor Lockham assures us that it will be reinstated upon completion of the project in May. In the meantime it will be necessary to walk along St. Albans Road to access the BUC car park.

Story of Adventists during 'The Great War'

 

This garden is intended to commemorate the stand taken by Adventists during 'The Great War' as conscientious objectors with many of them being imprisoned for their pacifist beliefs.

 

Whilst most of them were imprisoned in Dartmoor, Knutsford or Wakefield Prisons, a group of sixteen students attending the Adventist college situated at the time on Stanborough Park found themselves conscripted into the 3rd Eastern Non-Combatant Corps at Bedford Barracks in May 1916 and fourteen of them were subsequently sent to France. Whilst on the ship they were handed rifles which they refused and they were put aside at the docks where an unsuccessful attempt was made to break their resistance.

 

However, they were allowed to work for 18 months as stevedores unloading ships at Le Havre and elsewhere, allowed freedom of worship and excused work on the Sabbath (Saturday). Unfortunately, they were moved to a new area with a new commander in 1917 and ordered to work on their Sabbath - which they refused to do. This led to a court martial and they were sentenced to six months hard labour at Military Prison 3 in Le Harvre - a punishment designed to show that prison was not intended to be seen as an easy option and encourage deserters.

 

For standing up for their principles of not working on the Sabbath their time in this prison was particularly difficult and included regular beatings as those in charge were allowed to use any means at their disposal to achieve their objective. Their Bibles had been confiscated on entering the prison but one of the men had managed to secrete a copy of the Gospel of John which they shared between them, hiding the pages under their caps.

 

One day a chaplain from a neighbouring camp was passing and hearing shrieks asked to see the young Adventists but was refused admission. It was quite likely that it was he who raised the alarm with higher authorities back in Britain. A formal protest was made to the War Office by the Adventist church about the treatment these men were receiving which, thankfully, as a result lasted not much more than a month. The official response to the complaint was that the officers responsible had been punished. The men were subsequently released from the army and sent to Knutsford Work Centre and were returned to civilian life by July.

 

At least two members of the group died early partly as a result of ill health resulting from the treatment they received. Family members of three of this group are regular worshippers at Stanborough Park Church.

 

*For the full story see attached the PDF file written by Pastor Victor Hulbert, a relative of one of the conscripts.

Temporary closure of link path between the church and BUC car park

 

The link path between the church car park and the overflow car park situated at the BUC offices has been closed temporarily during the construction of the Peace Garden. Pastor Lockham assures us that it will be reinstated upon completion of the project in May. In the meantime it will be necessary to walk along St. Albans Road to access the BUC car park.

 

This garden is intended to commemorate the stand taken by Adventists during 'The Great War' as conscientious objectors with many of them being imprisoned for their pacifist beliefs.

 

Whilst most of them were imprisoned in Dartmoor, Knutsford or Wakefield Prisons, a group of sixteen students attending the Adventist college situated at the time on Stanborough Park found themselves conscripted into the 3rd Eastern Non-Combatant Corps at Bedford Barracks in May 1916 and fourteen of them were subsequently sent to France. Whilst on the ship they were handed rifles which they refused and they were put aside at the docks where an unsuccessful attempt was made to break their resistance.

 

However, they were allowed to work for 18 months as stevedores unloading ships at Le Havre and elsewhere, allowed freedom of worship and excused work on the Sabbath (Saturday). Unfortunately, they were moved to a new area with a new commander in 1917 and ordered to work on their Sabbath - which they refused to do. This led to a court martial and they were sentenced to six months hard labour at Military Prison 3 in Le Harvre - a punishment designed to show that prison was not intended to be seen as an easy option and encourage deserters.

 

For standing up for their principles of not working on the Sabbath their time in this prison was particularly difficult and included regular beatings as those in charge were allowed to use any means at their disposal to achieve their objective. Their Bibles had been confiscated on entering the prison but one of the men had managed to secrete a copy of the Gospel of John which they shared between them, hiding the pages under their caps.

 

One day a chaplain from a neighbouring camp was passing and hearing shrieks asked to see the young Adventists but was refused admission. It was quite likely that it was he who raised the alarm with higher authorities back in Britain. A formal protest was made to the War Office by the Adventist church about the treatment these men were receiving which, thankfully, as a result lasted not much more than a month. The official response to the complaint was that the officers responsible had been punished. The men were subsequently released from the army and sent to Knutsford Work Centre and were returned to civilian life by July.

 

At least two members of the group died early partly as a result of ill health resulting from the treatment they received. Family members of three of this group are regular worshippers at Stanborough Park Church.

 

*For the full story see attached the PDF file written by Pastor Victor Hulbert, a relative of one of the conscripts.